A Local Harvest Day!

Tuesday (yesterday) had many local happenings:

First pickup of our CSF (Community Supported Fishery) from Cape Ann Fresh Catch! This is a really cool organization that “looks to rejuvenate one of America’s original small businesses—fishing.”  The fish is caught sustainably, and the CSF supports a small fishery business.  By paying up front for a ‘share’ we also give the fishermen an economic support for up front costs to their business.  A fillet share from them  is 2 pounds of fish per week, which we signed up for. You can also get a whole fish, or alternating fish share.   They catch the fish the day of the distribution, and so what you get is a surprise until that day or week of your pickup.

When I came to the Jamaica Plain pickup site, there was a nice guy in a truck with coolers of ice and fish in little baggies. I got haddock this week!

Once out of the bag, it was a gloriously fresh and beautiful piece of fish!  I had to take lots of pictures!

First day of Copley Farmer’s Market!

The Copley Farmer’s Market, right at the park between the Boston Public Library and the big Church (Along St. James Ave. & Dartmouth St) holds many booths for local farms, dairies, bakeries, nursuries and the like during the warmer months.  It runs Tuesdays & Fridays, 11:00 am – 6:00 pm, May 18, 2010 – Nov 23, for 2010.

Being the first day, I hopped on down to check out what was there, and stocked up on good local produce and dairy products.  Here is my catch:

Strawberries! Cucumbers and Arugula from Atlas farms, an organic farm in Deerfield, MA.

Baby Bok Choy, Spinach, Tatsoi, Fava Bean Tendrils, and Baby Red Kale from Siena Farm, a farm from Sudbury, MA that uses “ecologically and socially responsible methods” according to their website (you never know, but the produce looked high quality).

Sundried tomato, basil goat cheese from Crystal Brook Farm, in Sterling, MA.

Yogurt from Narragansett Creamery, from RI.

With all this bounty, we made a very local meal for the evening:

Capered Fillets of Haddock with boiled potatoes served over arugula.

So Recipes:

Capered Fillets of Haddock: This recipe comes from “The Taste of Gloucester: A Fisherman’s Wife Cooks” cookbook bought through  Cape Ann Fresh Catch, and is by the Fishermen’s Wives of Gloucester and the Cape Ann League of Women Voters.  Thus far this cookbook seems awesome!

Recipe with our alterations: (Serves 4)

16 ounces of haddock- so 4oz each if we eat it for dinner and lunch

1.5 ounce of salted butter

1 tablespoon capers

flour, salt, black pepper

Directions:  Flour the fish lightly.  Put (.5) ounce of butter in a frying pan over a medium heat.  When it is foaming, put in the fish.  Cook for 5 minutes without touching them (really important for a lovely fishy crispy texture).  Salt and pepper them.  After cooking the second side, add the rest of the butter and capers to the pan, and allow to amalgamate and cook until done (the fish will flake and no longer be translucent).  Serve on arugula, sprinkle some lemon if you’d like to give it more of a piccata taste.

We simply boiled potatoes and washed arugula, and cut the potatoes, and set the fish and potatoes ontop of the arugula.

And I must say, it was delicious smelling (butter and fish) and oh my was it tasty.  Quick (only 30 minutes) and simple very local meal!

Local vs. Non-local ingredients:

This one is easy, everything was local, except the capers, salt, and pepper.  Everything else, including the flour (Upinngil Farm) and butter (Sidehill Farm). Pretty cool!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Fish Meals, Recipes and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s